East Devon: Thieves use a chainsaw to steal animal head sculptures from a farm shop walking trail, sparking a police appeal

Thieves have used a chainsaw to steal several animal head sculptures that were on display around a farm shop walking trail in East Devon.

Police keen to trace the nine animal head sculptures cut from their outdoor wooden plinths at Darts Farm, in Clyst St George, East Devon, are appealing for witnesses and information.

The force has released a gallery of images of the stolen sculptures, which were believed to have been cut off sometime between Sunday, July 7 and the following day, July 8.

The stolen sculptures of animal heads include a lion, barn owl, wolf and rhino.

East Devon

Police want to trace this stolen sculpture.
Photo: with permission.

sculpture

The animal heads, including this one, had been on display at Darts Farm.
Photo: with permission.

sculpture

Have you seen this stolen gorilla head?
Photo: with permission.

sculpture

This tiger head was stolen from the walking trail.
Photo: with permission.

sculpture

The wolf head sculpture was stolen.
Photo: with permission.

police

This rhino head was among the stolen haul.
Photo: with permission.

police

Police want to hear from you if you know the whereabouts of this sculpture.
Photo: with permission.

police

This barn owl sculpture was cut from its plinth and stolen.
Photo: with permission.

East Devon

Police are seeking information after nine sculptures, including this one, were stolen.
Photo: with permission.

A Devon and Cornwall Police spokesperson said: “Officers investigating the theft of a number of sculptures taken from Darts Farm Shopping Village near Exeter have released pictures of the stolen items.

“It has been reported that nine animal head sculptures were removed from their stands using a chainsaw and then stolen between Sunday 7 July and Monday 8 July.

“The sculptures had been situated along the walking trail area and officers are now turning to the public for help.”

If you have information to help the police investigation, call 101 or report it through the force website, quoting reference 50240168225.

East Devon towns and villages are urged to plan for extreme weather and flooding emergencies

About Author