Cancer charity supporting East Devon patients hails first-ever art exhibition a success, raising more than £1,600

An art exhibition in East Devon has been hailed a success, raising more than £1,600 for the Axminster and Lyme Cancer Support charity.

Some nine artists recently displayed and sold their work during a two-day exhibition held at the village hall, in Uplyme, on the East Devon border with Dorset.

Mary Kahn, Axminster and Lyme Cancer Support managing director, thanked all who helped make the two-day event a success – the first-ever exhibition for the cause –  and said the charity was already planning the 2023 show.

She said: “We are delighted that our local and talented artists came together to support us with this event, the first of its kind for our charity.

“We would like to thank all the artists who submitted their works and contributed to making this art show possible, as well as all our volunteers who helped to make this event possible.

“We also wish to thank Castlewood Vineyard for their support. We are already starting to plan ahead and look forward to next year’s event.”

She added: “We support anyone affected by any cancer in our area and this will help us to continue to provide needed help and care to many in our community.”

Axminster

Artist Christine Allison’s work.
Photo: with permission.

Axminster

Jools Woodhouse exhibited work.
Photo: with permission.

East Devon

Artist Anne Townsend’s work.
Photo: with permission.

Among the nine artists exhibiting their work was Dot Wood, who died earlier this year. Dot’s art was included and presented with the permission of her husband, Ian.

Artists Anne Townsend, Alban Connell, Alison Boskill, Liz Biles, Jools Woodhouse, Christine Allison, Jeanne Coates and Maggie Stead exhibited their work alongside Dot’s.

The November launch night was hailed a success, attracting 90 visitors to view the exhibition.

  • To find out more about Axminster and Lyme Cancer Support, its services, or to get involved, see here.

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